Living and the Dead

Today I travelled a wee bit outside of town, and came across a beautiful little village that contained two churches and a chapel. One, Anglican, the other, Catholic. Both were imbibed with the beautiful of 500 years, another a more Victorian structure (that was the Catholic) with seating in the upper part of the church as well as the lower. It is amazing what a God-fearing priest can do to revive the dusty faith of and ageing population.

Now, in both churches, the altars were facing ad orientem. Central to the Catholic church was the tabernacle placed beyond the altar. On said altar remained three traditional Mass cards, and a statue of Our Lady and St Therese on either side. The priest is a young, recently-ordained fellow and in charge of three other parishes. I had missed daily Mass, but it was evident how used the building was. According to the figures, it has been growing and growing each Sunday do to the attraction of traditionalists and those who seek a proper Mass each Sunday, as both rites are offered at the Church. I knelt at the altar rail for a prayer, and was moved at the tranquility the little building enclosed. There was a quaint little pump-organ placed in the back, and on it by some sort of Divine Providence was placed my favourite hymn. I managed to walk a little further around town, and enjoyed the familiar spray of salt water on my face. The beauty of God’s creating is amazing. And for someone struggling like I am, a five-hour drive from home truly does one a world of good.

The Anglican church was a fully wooden Gothic building, and a very grand one with the full English pipe organ, now in disuse (such a pity for a beautiful thing). Of course, the minister is a liberal who preaches the modernist concept of tolerance.

The building is threatened with closure.

So, it seems as though a dead faith makes a dead church… but a ‘lively’ faith, creates a lively congregation.

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Missa Cantata for the Feast of the Transfiguration

If anyone is in St John’s, Newfoundland (Talamh an Éisc)

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Missa Cantata (sung Traditional Latin Mass) will be celebrated on the Feast of the Transfiguration. The congregation is invited to participate in the singing of the Missa de Angelis.

This will be held at St Pius X Church Chapel, 16 Smithville Crescent, a parish of the Society of Jesus. Celebrant will be Fr William Browne, S.J.

The Latin Mass has endured on the very Irish island of Newfoundland due to the efforts of Una Voce – St Oliver Plunkett Chapter, and St John’s – the capital, is the oldest city in North America and sistered with Waterford.

A Latin Mass at a Jesuit parish! Don’t pass this up!